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Engaging Learners using OneNote

Blog post by Secondary Development Officer, Anna Kellner:

I have returned to teaching for two half days a week and am experimenting with the use of Class Notebook. I opted for the use of Class Notebook in an attempt to motivate learners who find maths a challenging subject. In the short time I have been using OneNote Class Notebook I am already aware of a number of advantages. These include pupils being able to access work anytime, anywhere, the efficient and easy monitoring and marking of work, the ability to differentiate material and provide timely feedback to learners.

How it worked…

I put notes into the Content Library so that pupils have something they can refer back to.

I then populated the pupil notebooks with corresponding sections containing questions on all of the topics.

Pupils worked independently on these questions whilst I monitored their work and marked everything they did from my own device.
If there was something that multiple pupils were struggling with then I would stop the class and go over the concept, these notes would go straight into the Content Library.

Whilst the pupil notebooks were populated with questions and tasks, for all of the upcoming topics, pupils did not have access to all of them at once.
To gain access to different sections pupils had to first complete the initial section, with the answers revealing the password to unlock the next stage. This allowed for self-paced learning and made differentiation inherent to the process, whilst ensuring learners’ knowledge was secure in each topic before moving on.

The class have been working well and they are engaged in their learning, they have also shown interest in accessing the notebook from home. The ability to constantly monitor and assess all pupil work has meant that I am aware of misconceptions at an early stage. Therefore I am able to scaffold and support individual learning needs.

For a guide on using OneNote Class Notebook click here.

Microsoft Classroom Pilot Launch

Last Friday a group of teachers visited the Microsoft Offices at Waverley gate in Edinburgh. They had a session led by Anna Kellner of the DLT with Natalie Burgess, Microsoft Teacher Ambassador and Andy Nagle, Microsoft Education. They are currently piloting Microsoft Classroom as the first teachers in Scotland to be using it with pupils.

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Anna Kellner, Leigh Gilmore, David Sansom, Liz Dighton and Jim Duchart at the Microsoft Offices

Microsoft Classroom is currently in its preview version, so the teachers will be providing valuable feedback to Microsoft about the product before it has its full launch in the near future. The Digital Learning Team are excited about the potential of this product and how it can help teachers and pupils in Edinburgh. We look forward to hearing feedback from our teachers and learning about how Classroom can have a positive impact on teaching and learning.

OneNote Class Notebook at St Ninian’s Primary School

IMG_1309Primary 6/7 at St Ninian’s RC PS are one of the first primary schools in Edinburgh to start using OneNote Class Notebook as a tool for learning, both in class and as a way of accessing and submitting homework online.

Within school time, Miss Murray, class teacher, uses the tool as an additional means of recording learning. She thinks that it has made a big difference to the more reluctant writers in her class, who are always keen to use Notebook and produce more content than they might if writing in a traditional jotter.  She also finds the collaboration space useful for group work, and has used this recently to plan their forthcoming Halloween Bake Sale. While planning, the learners could ask each other questions and leave comments about the ideas of others in a structured way. The collaboration space also makes it easy for a teacher to track the contributions made by each pupil.

Picture5Miss Murray was keen to get started with OneNote for setting and receiving homework as most of the children in her class are much more enthusiastic about doing homework if it involves using a computer. She still offers her learners the chance to submit their homework on paper but says that only a small number choose to do it this way. For Miss Murray, OneNote acts as a way of sharing homework tasks, information about trips and encourages pupil voice through class votes. Another advantage for teachers is that it saves time marking and means that teachers have fewer jotters to carry around since pupil input can be commented on virtually.

Picture1Picture2The children in Miss Murray’s class said:

“I love computers. It’s easier this way because you can’t lose the sheet.”

“We can download the program for free at home or use the online version.”

“It can sometimes be difficult to get on to so I like using a mixture of the computer and paper.”

“Your hands don’t hurt from writing when you type things!”

“It’s easier to spell things right when you’re typing.”

“It saves paper and it saves time. You don’t need to waste time finding a pencil, rubber or sharpener.”

(Please click on the images to view in more detail)

For more information on OneNote Click here: http://onenoteforteachers.com/